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Amy D. Pratt

Associate Director of the Office of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math) Education Partnerships (OSEP) at Northwestern University.

At OSEP, Amy works to connect K-12 teachers and students to the world-class resources of Northwestern University by developing STEM programs and partnership initiatives with schools, community organizations, libraries, and museums and corporations and other universities and colleges. Prior to joining OSEP, Amy was a Senior Consultant with Non-Profit Leadership, LLC (NPL) in Atlanta, Georgia. At NPL, Amy worked with non-profit organizations all over the US and internationally in the areas of fundraising, board development, and strategic planning.

Degrees: 

PhD, Geography, 2006.  Department of Geology and Geography, Eberly College of Arts and Sciences, West Virginia UniversityMA, Geography, 1999.   Department of Geology and Geography, Eberly College of Arts and Sciences, West Virginia UniversityBA, International Studies, 1995.  International Studies Program, Eberly College of Arts and Sciences, West Virginia University

Bio: 

Amy D. Pratt is the Associate Director of the Office of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math) Education Partnerships (OSEP) at Northwestern University.  At OSEP, Amy works to connect K-12 teachers and students to the world-class resources of Northwestern University by developing STEM programs and partnership initiatives with schools, community organizations, libraries, and museums and corporations and other universities and colleges.  Prior to joining OSEP, Amy was a Senior Consultant with Non-Profit Leadership, LLC (NPL) in Atlanta, Georgia.  At NPL, Amy worked with non-profit organizations all over the US and internationally in the areas of fundraising, board development, and strategic planning.  

During Amy’s time in the Department of Geology and Geography, she focused on international development.  Her graduate work focused on community-based, economic development projects in South Africa and Appalachia and their connections to social, economic, and political processes at the national and international scales.   To the great dismay of her graduate committee, Amy never wanted to be an academic and entered the non-profit sector after graduation.  She has worked as a practitioner ever since.

Amy has 10 years of experience with diverse NGO’s and non-profits in the US and developing countries, including Africa, with special expertise in capacity building, research, economic development, the environment, fundraising, program evaluation, and project management.  Amy worked for the Southeast Community Research Center, a non-profit research center focusing on community-based participatory research (CBPR).  At SCRC, Amy developed partnerships between community organizations, universities, and federal and state agencies.  Amy also served as the Development Director at the State YMCA of Georgia.  

From working with grass-roots organizations in rural Appalachia and southern Africa to large national and international organizations, Amy has learned the importance of forging sustainable partnerships between the non-profit, corporate, academic and government sectors when seeking meaningful and lasting social change.  Amy is also interested in new social entrepreneurship models within both the for-profit and non-profit sectors and how they are working to create social value and solve the most pressing social and economic problems of our time.

How the Department of Geology and Geography at WVU prepared me for success in my career?

Geography, because it seeks to understand and explain human-environment relationships, is important to the future of our country and world.  Geography can help solve socioeconomic, political, and environmental problems and geographic education must be a priority within our educational system at all levels.  The Department of Geology and Geography at WVU emphasizes this important point and therefore equips students with the knowledge, skills, and abilities to have cutting-edge careers and also contribute to the betterment of society.   As a student, I was taught to think and problem solve within an environment that was open, stimulating and respectful.  I obtained skills in research, writing, technology, teaching, and public speaking and was given travel and leadership opportunities.   My time in the Department of Geology and Geography also allowed me to excel as an individual but also develop the ability to function well on a team, particularly with people who have differing perspectives.  I thank G&G and the discipline of Geography for the skills, opportunities, and worldview that have enabled me to excel in my career.  

Career Advice

Do what you love and what motivates you—we spend most of our daily lives at work!  Get a mentor and always have a plan for where you want to be in five to ten years.  And finally, use the knowledge and skills you have to make the world a better place, whether it is through your job or volunteer work.

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